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Site-specific installation
 

On Tangled Breath 

RE: WILD Artists at Maketank group exhibition

Mixed-media installation comprised of Holm oak branches, yarn, beeswax, wool roving on linen, poem

 MakeTank Exeter

February 10--March 6, 2022

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On Tangled Breath

Taut, crouched,

clawing at the threshold of sightless sanctum,

a feral figure shedding flesh for flight

and age for rapturous rage.

 

Burrowing 

on tangled breath 

from buoyant heart

leaps agile transfiguration.

 

Are we not inhabitants of the soul,

recklessly crushing petals beneath our toes?

 

Wisdom-wise we eulogise,

while scraping taloned hands across trackless lands,

taming our young for belaboured labour,

as numbness sprawls across the yawn of years.

 

Sweet retreat,  

an animalistic animism.

A silent salutation 

beneath bowered branches.

 

Terminal eternity.

-Annie Murdock

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Plantibodies, "Out of a House Walked a Plant as part of the CAMP exhibition Antibodies: art during the pandemic

Mixed-media installation and performance conceived by Bryan Brown and Olya Petrakova with Annie Murdock and Johanna Korndorfer MakeTank Exeter

October 2021

 

Our installation and performance addressed the medical research into 'plantibodies' (plants injected with human DNA as a host for producing antibodies), the conventional assumption that the natural world is non-sentient, and the implications of plantibody research on all life forms and the consequences for ecological ethics as a whole.

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Neo-Dada for Pachamama

Window display by Annie Murdock with Herman Castaneda | AWEsome Art Space Exeter, UK

 March 2021

Neo-Dada for Pachamama is a tragi-comic effort to expose the absurdities of our times in the spirit of the Dada Art ‘mode of being’, while eyeing the Earth’s wisdom-keepers within indigenous communities across the globe, who have directly suffered from the decisions borne out of greed and corporate gain at great expense to the Earth and its peoples.

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CircleTales: Cherry Blossom

Community workshop and installation at Maketank Exeter for Living Spaces

March 2019

For this installation, together with my partner Herman Castaneda with whom I created CircleTales, a collaborative tabletop storytelling game, we invited a small group of women between the ages of 13 and 65+ to play CircleTales, generating an evocative collective story. We then elaborated our ideas through a drawing exercise to further develop the visual and thematic aspects of the story, from which we  created an ambient installation which featured a recorded narration of the story.

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Moon Gate + Ojo de Dios

 

Site-specific installation for El Charco del Ingenio Jardín Botánico

San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, 2013.

'Ojo de Dios' and 'Moongate' comprised a site-specific installation for Land Art, a group exhibition at El Charco del Ingenio Jardín Botánico in Mexico, whereby selected artists were invited to respond to its unique terrain of cacti, canyons, and river, through environmental installations and interventions.

 

I created 'Moongate', a semi-circular ʻportalʼ made of reeds and desiccated cactus, set on the banks of the garden’s reservoir,as a means of beckoning visitors to pass through the circular gate towards the multicolored 'Ojo de Dios' beyond, which I envisioned as a focal satellite for meditation and reflection.

 

'Ojo de Dios', a large weaving of approximately 2 meters in diameter, was crafted using local wool that I dyed with the bright tints of plant materials from the botanical garden itself:  cochineal, eucalyptus, peppercorn, along with other native plants. Inspired by the ubiquitous 'Eye of God' symbol, a powerful shamanic tool across cultures, from the Huichol people of Northern Mexico, to the indigenous traditions of Tibet, Ireland, Africa, and the American Southwest, the form is universally a symbol of protection and communion with Spirit. The paired pieces, initially bright with color and living plant materials, gradually faded under the sun, the rain, and the elements, a reminder of our own ephemerality and the cyclical transformation of all living things, which inevitable degrade and return to the land.

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Art from Ashes

Site-specific installation for El Charco del Ingenio Jardín Botánico

San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, 2011

 ‘Art from Ashes’ was a site-specific installation for Land Art, a group exhibition at El Charco del Ingenio Jardín Botánico in Mexico in 2011, whereby selected artists were invited to respond to its unique terrain of cacti, canyons, and river, through environmental installations and interventions.

 

The botanical garden had recently experienced a massive wildfire that ravaged a large portion of the garden. ‘Art from Ashes’ was conceived as a response, an offering of hope during a bleak time for the garden. The installation, a circular ‘mandala’, is comprised of groupings of charred branches collected from the site of the fire joined together with embroidered centerpieces, alluding to the industriousness of spiders--to wisdom, creativity, and new life, to the possibility of creation that arises from the fertile soil of ash. The circle denotes new beginnings, second chances, new opportunities and most importantly, the resilience of nature.

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On the Threshold of Memory
"Entre Muros/Between Walls", Galería Chavez Morado, Universidad de Guanajuato,
Guanajuato, Mexico, 2006

 

This group exhibition, curated by Reynaldo Thompson, invited artists in Mexico and in the United States to consider the topic of cross-border migration amidst a political policy of wall-building by the US government along the shared border.

My response was to sew an ephemeral 'home', suspended above the ground with marigolds/cempasuchil flowers arranged beneath (a bittersweet symbol of the Mexican Día de los Muertos that honours departed loved ones) as a metaphor for longing, memory, and the rootlessness that is prompted by migration.

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